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January 7, 2017
Peter Stackpole, Jeanne Crain (cover shot for Life magazine, September 30, 1946), 1946 (print probably 1970s), gelatin silver print. Purchased through the Elizabeth and David C. Lowenstein ’67 Fund and the Fund for Contemporary Photography; 2016.30.17.

Hood Quarterly, winter 2017

Photography at the Hood: An Update

The two biggest stories of twentieth-century art were abstraction and the emergence of photography. The first is well represented in all its variety by the Hood collection, from its 1912 Pablo Picasso to the Mark Rothko, the Ellsworth Kelly, the Alma Thomas, and the Pat Steir, among many other great works of art. The second story is one we are now redoubling our efforts to tell fully. There are many issues...

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September 8, 2016
Kabul, Afghanistan, 1996.

by Dartmouth's Office of Communications

The more than 500,000 images document conditions in the world’s most dangerous places.

The Hood Museum of Art at Dartmouth has acquired the complete archive of award-winning photojournalist and war photographer James Nachtwey ’70, who has spent more than 35 years documenting conditions in some of the world’s most dangerous conflict zones.

Nachtwey’s archive—made up of more than 500,000 images—bring to the College a photography collection of great historical significance, encompassing every photograph taken by Nachtwey...

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September 1, 2016
Mostar, Bosnia-Herzegovina, 1993.

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2016

The Hood Museum of Art has acquired the complete archive of James Nachtwey, an award-winning photojournalist who has spent over 35 years documenting conditions in some of the world’s most dangerous conflict zones. This acquisition brings to Dartmouth a photography collection of great historical significance, encompassing every...

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September 1, 2016
James Nachtwey. Photo by Eli Burakian.

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2016

Senior Curator of Collections and Barbara C. and Harvey P. Hood 1918 Curator of Academic Programming Katherine Hart sent James Nachtwey a series of questions upon the completion of the museum’s acquisition of his life’s work. Here are his replies.

What does the archive’s coming to Dartmouth mean to you?

Beginning in 1981, I committed myself to documenting contemporary history, worldwide, as...

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July 13, 2016
Dartmouth students in the Hood's conference room participating in the 2016 spring session of Museum Collecting 101. Photo by Alison Palizzolo.

by Eva Munday '16, Hood Programming Class of 1954 Intern

Dartmouth students take with them various memories of their college years, whether volunteering at a local organization, a performance at the Hopkins Center, service as a class officer, or participation in a particularly important campus discussion. For the past fifteen years, the Hood Museum of Art has been providing another a memorable experience for students, and also an opportunity to leave their mark on campus. In a special non-curricular course, a group of Dartmouth students get to choose a work of art for the Hood's...

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June 1, 2016
Alma Woodsey Thomas, Wind Dancing with Spring Flowers, 1969, acrylic on canvas. Purchased through a gift by exchange from Evelyn A. and William B. Jaffe, Class of 1964H; 2016.5. Photo courtesy of Connersmith Gallery, Washington, D.C.

Hood Quarterly, spring/summer 2016

Alma Thomas (American, 1891–1978) based her paintings on nature. In the case of Wind Dancing with Spring Flowers, she was inspired by the circular formal gardens of Washington, D.C. Like the other Color Field painters in her city, including Morris Louis, Kenneth Noland, Sam Gilliam, and Gene Davis, Thomas used the exuberance and power of color to carry the emotional content of her paintings. More...

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June 1, 2016
Lyman, Fenton & Company (1849–52) / United States Pottery Company (1853–58), Bennington, Vermont; Daniel Greatbatch (b. England, active 1838–c. 1861), possible modeler, Pair of Lions, about 1849–58, green and amber “flint enamel” lead glaze on white earth

Hood Quarterly, spring/summer 2016

Like many other trades, pottery production in nineteenth-century America shifted from small shops reliant on hand craftsmanship to larger operations that utilized new techniques to reach expanded, more dispersed markets. By the mid-nineteenth century, Bennington, Vermont—long a center for the production of ceramics—had become one of the foremost pottery producers nationally. In 1848, the succession of Bennington’s Norton and Fenton family...

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October 20, 2015
Attributed to William Hart, Tannery in the Catskills, early 1850s, oil on canvas.

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2015

Tannery in the Catskills is remarkable for its fusion of a romantic, mid-19th–century landscape aesthetic with a detailed depiction of industry—a subject usually antithetical to the pastoral ideal. The painting’s mountainous terrain, atmospheric perspective, and elevated vantage point typify the idealized compositions that lured tourists to such picturesque destinations as the Catskills and the White Mountains....

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October 20, 2015
The south façade of the Hood Museum of Art and Maffei Arts Plaza with Kiki Smith's Refuge. Ellsworth Kelly's Dartmouth Panels are just visible through the foliage at left.

Hood Quarterly, autumn 2015

Kiki Smith, Hoarfrost with Rabbit [now titled Refuge], 2014, stainless steel

I trust my work. It’s a collaboration with the material, and when it’s viewed, it’s a collaboration with the world. What your work is resides in between those different spaces.
—Kiki Smith, 2005

Kiki Smith is one of the most inventive and intuitive artists of her generation. Her work engages with a...

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June 1, 2015
Benny Andrews, Witness

Hood Quarterly, summer 2015
Juliette Bianco, Interim Director

Both depicting black life in America from a well of personal emotion and experience and advocating publicly for black artists, Benny Andrews (1930–2006) never distinguished art from education from activism. One of ten children in a Madison, Georgia, sharecropper family of African, Scottish, and Cherokee lineage, Andrews always identified as African American. After serving in the U.S. Air Force, he attended the School of the Art...

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