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Past Exhibitions

The Art of Weapons

Selections from the African Collection

April 26, 2014, through March 13, 2016
Unknown artist, Teke peoples, Ngala peoples, Democratic Republic of Congo, Central Africa, executioner’s sword (detail), metal. Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College: Museum purchase; 39.64.6954.

This exhibition explores the Hood Museum of Art's extraordinary collection of African weapons for the first time. It focuses on the aesthetic quality of the objects, and on the ways in which they reflect notions of masculinity, warriorhood, and ideal male beauty in traditional African societies. Because the weapons are in a Western museum's collection, the exhibition also considers Western notions of masculinity, as represented in the collecting practices of those Christian missionaries, colonial administrators, military officers, big game hunters, and explorers who acquired most of these weapons in the late nineteenth and first half of the twentieth centuries. Although the exhibition draws from several cultures in the five sub-regions of Africa, it is not a broad survey of African weapons. Instead, it presents exemplary highlights from the Hood's extensive collection, categorized as "offensive" and "defensive" weapons.

Points of View

January 04, 2016, through March 13, 2016
Albrecht Durer, Saint Jerome in His Study

The works of art in this exhibition, arranged in pairs, offer contrasting positions by artists on a variety of themes: men and women, the family, war and human suffering, landscapes and seascapes, images of others and of the self. Each pair is accompanied by a single question intended to provoke further questions about the artists’ individual approaches to their subjects: From what points of view (literal, emotional, intellectual) does the artist look at his/her subject? Is the artist’s stance celebratory? honorific? critical? a form of protest? In what ways does the artist communicate this to the beholder? Art history professors Joy Kenseth and Mary Coffey curated this exhibition in conjunction with their course Introduction to the History of Art II, a survey of art and architecture from 1500 to the present.

Inventory

New Works and Conversations around African Art

January 16, 2016, through March 13, 2016
Lamidi Fakeye, Yoruba kneeling female figure holding a bowl

Successive African art curators at the Hood Museum of Art have assembled an extraordinary and holistic vision of the arts of Africa that encompasses both important historical milestones and the multiple cultural and social vistas of this continent. Acquired over the past two years and on view together for the first time, these thirty-one exceptional objects map the contour of modern and contemporary African art from the 1960s to the present while also shedding critical light on the diversity of African artistic practices by multiple generations of artists. The installation includes an exciting array of paintings, photographs, sculptures, drawings, ceramic, and mixed media, including works by Ibrahim El Salahi, Lamidi Fakeye, Akin Fakeye, Owusu-Ankomah, Victor Ekpuk, Chike Obeagu, Candice Breitz, Nomusa Makhubu, Julien Sinzogan, Aida Muluneh, Halida Boughriet, Mario Macilau, Eric van Hove, Khulumeleni Magwaza, and Nidhal Chamekh.

Eric Aho

Ice Cuts

January 09, 2016, through March 13, 2016
Eric Aho, Ice Cut (Arctic Sky), 2015

Vermont-based artist Eric Aho’s series of Ice Cuts paintings is inspired by the hole cut in the ice in front of a Finnish sauna, an aspect of Finnish culture that Aho’s family has maintained to this day. Intended for an icy immersion following the heat of the sauna, the avanto, as it is called in Finnish, underscores and personalizes the inherent contrasts in nature. Aho began the Ice Cuts series nine years ago, making one painting a year of the dark void produced by the act of sawing into the thick ice. This exhibition is the first to concentrate on the Ice Cuts paintings he has created to date. The central abstract form in these compositions provides the structure for experimentation with paint texture, surface, and subtly nuanced color, lending these frozen scenes both an austere beauty and a particular vibrancy. This exhibition brings together the major paintings in the series to date and smaller, related works on paper to offer unique insight into the artistic process.

Contemporary Abstraction

Works from the Hood Museum of Art’s Permanent Collection

January 04, 2016, through March 13, 2016
Pat Steir, Red and Red

This exhibition features paintings by both American and Indigenous Australian artists and reveals the strength of the Hood’s contemporary holdings, including a selection of recent acquisitions with new work by Pat Steir, Colleen Randall, and Brenda Garand.

The Concinnitas Portfolio

January 05, 2016, through March 13, 2016
Simon Kirwan Donaldson, English, born 1957 Ampere's Law, number 3 of 10, from the portfolio Concinnitas 2014 Aquatint on Rives BFK paper Purchased through the Phyllis and Bertram Geller 1937 Memorial Fund and the Anonymous Fund # 144

Concinnitas is a Latin term that connotes an elegant, skillful joining of elements. It was used by Renaissance scholar, artist, and architect Leon Battista Alberti (1404–1472) to describe the beauty found in the confluence of perfect uses of number, position, and outline. The Concinnitas project was a two-year collaborative venture between Parasol Press and Daniel Rockmore, professor of mathematics and computer science at Dartmouth. In 2012, Parasol commissioned ten mathematicians, physicists, and computer scientists—including two Nobel Laureates and five Fields Medalists—to create etchings of the mathematical expression most meaningful to them. These formulae were then printed by the fine-art print shop Harlan and Weaver as aquatints, evoking the look of equations quickly and elegantly sketched in white chalk on a blackboard.

The 2015 Nepal Earthquake

Photographs by James Nachtwey and Kevin Bubriski

January 23, 2016, through March 13, 2016
Kevin Bubriski, Anisha Shresta is 7 years old and in the second grade. She and her brother Ganesh walk through the ruins in Charikot twice a day to get from their house to the school, 2015, archival pigment digital print. Courtesy of the artist. © Kevin B

In the spring of 2015, just days after a magnitude 7.8 earthquake shook Gorkha District and surrounding areas in Nepal, photojournalist James Nachtwey ’70 documented the immediate aftermath among these devastated communities, both in urban centers and in mountain villages only accessible by helicopter. Six weeks later, photographer Kevin Bubriski arrived in Kathmandu and captured the rebuilding of a city and the resilience of its people. A few of those images by each photographer are on view in this exhibition.

The Stahl Collection

August 01, 2015, through December 07, 2015
Georges Rouault, Amazone (Equestrian)

The Hood Museum of Art's striking installation of thirty prints, drawings, and ceramics from the recently donated Stahl collection presents a wonderful opportunity to learn from art objects chosen by passionate, discerning collectors. Assembled over a period of sixty years, these highlights include bold, socially critical German Expressionist prints by Max Beckmann, Ludwig Meidner, and Emil Nolde, complemented by early twentieth-century American works on paper in a social realist mode. A cornerstone of the Stahl collection, assembled over decades, is Georges Rouault’s poignant series of eight aquatints titled The Circus (Le Cirque), 1930. The installation also features late twentieth-century works by New Hampshire artists, including James Aponovich and pioneering ceramicists Gerry Williams and Edwin and Mary Scheier. These highlights are drawn from the 118 works donated by Susan E. Hardy, Nancy R. Wilsker, Sarah A. Stahl, and John S. Stahl, the children of the original collectors, the late Barbara J. and David G. Stahl, Dartmouth Class of 1947. The high quality of the works, combined with their strong thematic links to a wide range of academic fields, makes these new acquisitions... read more

Tradition and Transformation

Twentieth-Century Inuit Art from the Collection of the Hood Museum of Art

October 22, 2014, through December 06, 2015
carved whalebone inlaid with walrus ivory, baleen, and stone

The majority of artists in this installation represent a generation of Inuit from the arctic and subarctic regions of Canada who lived fully “on the land.” Several changes occurred during the mid-twentieth century that pressured the Inuit to change their traditional life ways by moving into settlements. Although the Inuit had been trading works they made out of a variety of materials since the time of contact, new visitors encouraged them to use their knowledge and skills to create work—in stone, fabric, drawings, and on paper—that would be oriented for a non-Inuit art market.

The majority of works in this installation were made by the first generation of Inuit artists to exhibit and sell their work to new markets in the south through art dealers and cooperatives. The objects they produced are remarkable works of art, widely sought after by collectors, and now in the collections of major museums all over the world. Most importantly, the production of this work created a vehicle for preserving cultural knowledge and sustaining tradition while innovating and creating new forms of expression.

Collecting and Sharing

Trevor Fairbrother, John T. Kirk, and the Hood Museum of Art

August 22, 2015, through December 06, 2015
McDermott & McGough, Keyhole

This exhibition features the collection of Trevor Fairbrother, an independent curator, and John T. Kirk, a scholar of early American decorative arts, who have donated important works in their collection to the museum. Emphasizing the Hood’s teaching mission, this exhibition is thematically organized and each section displays one work from the museum’s collection alongside those of the donors. These themes include Histories, Wonders, Goods, Marks, Geometries, Males, and Surfaces. The exhibition will showcase paintings, drawings, and sculpture alongside early American furniture and include works by Carl Andre, Richard Artschwager, Bernd and Hilla Becher, Joseph Beuys, Marsden Hartley, Mike Kelley, Sol Lewitt, Glenn Ligon, Catherine Opie, Elizabeth Peyton, John Singer Sargent, Andy Warhol, Tom Wesselmann, Robert Wilson, and many others.

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